Tag Archives: 2019 geo hipster calendar

Maps and Mappers of the 2019 GeoHipster calendar — Pete King, June

Q: Tell us about yourself.

A: I work in Wellington, New Zealand, as a GIS analyst/ spatial developer at Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) in the Topography team. Day to day, I mostly work in a small team developing inhouse QGIS plugins or processing data using open source tools, but I try to find opportunities to create maps, icons or posters whenever I can. Sometimes its communist style posters about hot desking or Map Man (my coworker who gets called on to save the day with map emergencies), other times it’s more serious, like the Matariki Map.

Q: Tell us the story behind your map (what inspired you to make it, what did you learn while making it, or any other aspects of the map or its creation you would like people to know).

A: The Matariki map came from some really nice constellation design I had come across, which just sat in the back of my head for a while until I finally put two and two together as Matariki was getting closer last year. Matariki is becoming more and more popular in New Zealand, and I live in a small seaside town just out of Wellington that hosts amazing Matariki celebrations with great stories for the kids and walks to find the glow worms, but I still hadn’t delved too deeply into the history of Matariki. I am lucky enough to have amazing tikanga (customs) advisors at LINZ who were able to help me to understand its importance and give the design I had some real depth and background. For me personally the most interesting part of the journey was learning about Matariki’s shifts through history: once, it was a significant celebration, then it was almost entirely forgotten, and now it’s experiencing this amazing revival (including its widespread embrace by Pākehā [settler] culture) due to the emergence of tikanga and Te Reo Māori (Māori language) initiatives.

Q: Tell us about the tools, data, etc., you used to make the map.

A: This map was made using QGIS, Inkscape and open data from LINZ (data.linz.govt.nz) so I’m gonna use this to tell you about how much I love open source, and throw in a shameless plug for FOSS4G SotM Oceania! I was lucky enough to get my first GIS job after uni at LINZ, where there were already strong champions of open source and open data. Even though my job was a lot different to what it is now, I was still using QGIS and plugins we had developed in house. My passion for open source started properly two years ago, when I was able to go to FOSS4G Boston and more importantly the amazing QGIS users conference in Nødebo, Denmark. I’ve always been an empathetic person (one of my first jobs was a veterinary nurse), and more of a sharer than a hoarder, so it’s no surprise that the incredible community and ideas behind open source made a real impression on me at these conferences. I also love great food and Nødebo was up there with the best I’ve had, which would definitely have helped win me over. Since these conferences I have been tinkering more and more with creating maps in QGIS and using my inkscape poster design skills to add those finishing touches. As well as getting deeper and deeper into plugin development at work, don’t get me started on how amazing automatic testing is. But there is one thing I love more than open source and that’s having a FOSS4G in our own backyard, and this year it is in Wellington and LINZ is helping to organise it! I missed out going to last year’s conference in Melbourne and everyone keeps going and on about how amazing it was so I won’t be missing out on this year’s. Though I did get to go to Boston and Denmark, and a tea towel with my map and logo design was brought back for me, so I probably shouldn’t complain. So if you want to see some of the amazing open source work going on in Oceania, or drag along coworkers to expose them to open source, you should definitely come along on the 12-15 November. https://foss4g-oceania.org/ Shameless plug over.

For the map itself I used a combination of populated places data from Koordinates, as well as highways and elevation data from LINZ. I styled the populated places so that larger cities appeared as brighter stars, and joined them using the major highways as a guide. To create the milkyway like cloud in the background I played with different elevations till I found a coverage I liked the look of. Once the map had been designed I exported to svg and loaded in inkscape. I used inkscape to create the custom font for the title by turning the text to a path (treating it like vector data) and adding in the koru like circle at the end of some letters. I also used it for placing and aligning the text on the side, I personally find aligning easier in inkscape.

(Not my tea towel, mines is locked inside a vault for safe keeping.)

Maps and mappers of the 2019 calendar: Kenneth Field, Cover

Q: Tell us about yourself.

A: I’m Ken, I’m a bit of a cartonerd. For the last 8 years I’ve allowed Esri to pay me to work for them. Technically I’m a ‘Senior Software Product Engineer’ but more informally I make maps, write about maps, talk about maps, teach about making maps and generally make myself a nuisance wherever there’s an opinion to be shared about, you guessed it, maps. Prior to working for the California-based Geogoliathon I spent around 20 years as an academic in UK universities teaching cartography, GIS, and geography. I’ve recently had a book published called (wait for it) Cartography. And developed a free Massive Open Online Course (#cartoMOOC) on the same subject which we’ve taught to 70,000 people and counting. My passion and profession align in my geo-lifestyle. I blog at cartonerd, and the ICA Commission on Map Design, and tweet @kennethfield. I play the drums (badly), like riding my snowboard in the mountains (with map-themed helmet, goggles and jacket of course), and for my sins I am an avid supporter of Nottingham Forest FC.

Q: Tell us the story behind your map (what inspired you to make it, what did you learn while making it, or any other aspects of the map or its creation you would like people to know).

A: I’m always looking for interesting mapping themes. Normally these would involve the search for digital data that has to be persuaded and cajoled into some sort of map. I like to show people how to make great maps, sometimes just solid techniques done well, other times something a bit weird and wonderful to push the envelope, break a few rules and get creative. But I also like to use different mediums for making a map whether using Lego, pen and ink or…cheese. And these sort of maps are the ones that tend to stick in the memory because they’re different. They don’t conform. I was inspired by a map of English biscuits made by Chris Wesson a couple of years ago. It was a map of the UK with pictures of all sorts of tasty biscuits, where they were from and a little of their history. It was a great map but I couldn’t help think Chris might have actually made a large map as some sort of tablecloth and put real biscuits on top. And that’s when I thought of taking the basic idea and applying the concept to the UK cheese. Cartography is often about stealing ideas and then fashioning something new or interesting out of them and, so, I set about thinking through the map. It was an obvious approach really – I’d need a cheese board. I’d need it in the shape of the UK. And on top I’d place a selection of fine, rare, important or bizarre cheese. I’d take a picture and then people will eat the map…and the map would disappear. It’d be a one-time edible map. I researched the history of UK cheese production. I sought to identify a good geographical mix and from a list of around 400 cheeses I whittled it down to around 30 which would fit on a map.

Q: Tell us about the tools, data, etc., you used to make the map.

A: The map was fairly simple in design – just ceremonial counties of the UK. I made it in ArcGIS Pro and exported it as an svg file. By now I’d realised that I didn’t have the tools or experience to whittle the wood myself. I found a great craftsman called Andrew Abbott who had a CNC router and laser engraver. He took my design and made the map out of laminated blocks of Maple. We discussed all sorts of design aspects. He advised on what would work typographically at the scale of the final board. I was also planning on making the Isle of Man into a hole in the board but he suggested bits of cheese would simply fall through and get stuck…so I adapted the design accordingly. I also needed to do some really hefty generalisation on the coastline and internal boundaries so the laser engraver would work well – there simply wasn’t the space for overly complicated linework. It was a really good process to work together to ensure the design would work in the medium he was crafting.

I ended up with a cheese board around a metre tall and nearly as wide. Space for around 30-40 pieces of cheese. Sourcing the cheese wasn’t as simple as nipping to the local supermarket. The selection simply isn’t broad enough and some of the hard to get cheeses had to be sourced from niche artisanal suppliers. Some cheese was out of production (being seasonal), some impossible to source and some just not available in a quantity that would work. I eventually used a series of suppliers, had the cheese sent to my brother’s house in the UK as close to its eventual use as possible. I boarded a flight to the UK with my cheese board well packaged as excess baggage. It arrived in the UK undamaged. My brother drove the cheese to London from his home in Lincolnshire the day before it was to be displayed and I got the board and cheese across London to the Geovation hub one evening in September 2018 to display at the #geomob event. Cheese unwrapped, positioned according to a geographical list I’d prepared to ensure I didn’t make a mess of locating each piece, added a few labels and some context and sat back to watch a hungry crowd devour it. I wrote up a more extensive blog about the map here and there’s a bit on the GeoHipster blog here.

What next? Well, I quite like craft beer and there’s definitely geo in that. And someone suggested whiskey, except I can’t stand the stuff. Never have been able to drink it after a very unfortunate incident in my younger days. That’s another story entirely.