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Maps and Mappers of the 2019 calendar: Chris Van Pollard

Q: Tell us about yourself.

A: What’s up! I’m Chris, and I’ve been making maps and tinkering with GIS for over 19 years in the GIS Department at a Regional Planning Commission in the City of Brotherly Love (Philly, Philly!). I spend most of my days focusing on all aspects of geospatial technology, cartography, spatial thinking, and hacking away at web maps. I’m a huge ice hockey and coffee enthusiast, which helps fuel that passion to learn and improve my cartography and web mapping skills. Since 2012, I’ve been an adjunct professor at Rowan University, in Southern New Jersey, teaching young minds about GIS, the mystifying transformations of map projections, and cartographic design.

Q: Tell us the story behind your map (what inspired you to make it, what did you learn while making it, or any other aspects of the map or its creation you would like people to know).

A: This map allowed me to combine my passion and love for ice hockey with that of cartography. I was inspired by the amazing work, map design, and GIS tools that carto-wizards John Nelson, Ken Fields, and Johan Adkins have been sharing with us lately. John’s series on Air Mile Index  gave me the initial idea that I wanted to map how far each NHL team travels throughout the season. I wanted to determine if there was a correlation between performance (wins) and how much travel affects the players throughout the season. I was able to find the 2017-2018 NHL Travel Super Schedule in a user-friendly spreadsheet listing all the games for the season. Next, I added the Latitudes and Longitudes for all of the “Home” game teams, and included a sequence/order so that I could generate an Origin/Destination pairing between games. Once I had the data prepared, I utilized ArcMap’s XY-to-Line Tool to generate the paths. I wanted to learn more about the layout tools and capabilities in ArcGIS Pro, so I decided that I would make this map within that platform. Before diving into this project, my ArcGIS Pro skills were limited, but through this process I was able to learn, fail, try again, and have fun while doing it.

Q: Tell us about the tools, data, etc., you used to make the map.

A: Shapefiles, Shapefiles, and more Shapefiles. This map was made using ArcGIS Pro with a little data creation assistance from ArcMap. The symbology and transparency tools in ArcGIS Pro are incredibly exciting to work with, making map creation fun. I used Adobe Illustrator to create the Old School hockey mask to add that extra flair. Initially I needed to create a point shapefile, then I used the hockey mask as a marker symbol layer in Pro to allow me to adjust its transparency so that it faded into the basemap.

 

Maps and mappers of the 2019 calendar: Tom Chadwin

Q: Tell us about yourself

A: I live in deepest rural Northumberland, close to the England-Scotland border. I studied Middle Irish at university (coincidentally becoming friends there with Richard Fairhurst of OpenStreetMap fame), and then started work as a printer (not a successful one). I worked as a web designer in the days of version 3 of both Internet Explorer and Netscape Navigator, and then a web developer in the days of classic ASP, before .NET was invented. I’ve been in the public sector for over fifteen years now, most of them at Northumberland National Park, working on networking and open-source telephony, among many other things. We made the switch from MapInfo to QGIS many years ago now, and have never looked back.

I got involved with QGIS when I started to help out with the plugin qgis2leaf by Riccardo Klinger. Since then, I created qgis2web, which I still develop and maintain. I try to help out with QGIS and OSGeo events in the UK, and co-chaired FOSS4GUK 2018 with James Milner. Please come along to FOSS4GUK 2019 in Edinburgh this autumn!


Q: Tell us the story behind your map (what inspired you to make it, what did you learn while making it, or any other aspects of the map or its creation you would like people to know)

A: In 2018, our local council proposed the closure of our local first school. Our daughter was in her last year at this amazing place, so we resisted. I thought that some striking maps might help our case, so I made one map of the proposed increase in journey-to-school time (below), and a second map of the signatories to the petition to save the school. The signatories map is the February 2019 GeoHipster map:

Q: Tell us about the tools, data, etc., you used to make the map.

A: The map was built almost entirely in QGIS. I used GIMP to add the tilt-shift blur, and because of this blur, I had to use GIMP for the text as well. The data was scant to the point of naivety, being simply the postcodes of around 400 petition signatories.

The idea behind the map was to try to use this scant data in an emotive way, in what was an emotive argument. Visual appeal was of greater importance than spatial analysis, which is just as well, since I’m no spatial analyst. The scant data and the intent to grab attention led to my using the height of the styled points to denote not number of signatories, but proximity to the school. My hope was that this visualized how highly localized the support for the school was, a fact not immediately apparent from the raw data.

Technically, the overriding technique and principle behind the map is the separation of data from style. No processing at all was done on the data, which was a necessity because I was designing the map while the petition was still gathering signatures, so the data was changing all the time. All the heavy lifting is done by QGIS geometry generators, creating squares around the points, rotating and skewing them into faux perspective, and then extruding them into 2.5D symbols.

I had a huge amount of help from the Twitter carto community, without which I simply could not have built the map. I wrote about both maps in much greater detail on my website: tom.chadw.in/wrote/MappingEmotion.

The school was saved from closure, but further unwanted changes to our rural schools are ongoing, and the fight continues. Who knows whether this map had any effect on the Council, but it did result in a very old friend describing it as the “worst game of Risk ever”.

Maps and mappers of the 2019 calendar: Kenneth Field, Cover

Q: Tell us about yourself.

A: I’m Ken, I’m a bit of a cartonerd. For the last 8 years I’ve allowed Esri to pay me to work for them. Technically I’m a ‘Senior Software Product Engineer’ but more informally I make maps, write about maps, talk about maps, teach about making maps and generally make myself a nuisance wherever there’s an opinion to be shared about, you guessed it, maps. Prior to working for the California-based Geogoliathon I spent around 20 years as an academic in UK universities teaching cartography, GIS, and geography. I’ve recently had a book published called (wait for it) Cartography. And developed a free Massive Open Online Course (#cartoMOOC) on the same subject which we’ve taught to 70,000 people and counting. My passion and profession align in my geo-lifestyle. I blog at cartonerd, and the ICA Commission on Map Design, and tweet @kennethfield. I play the drums (badly), like riding my snowboard in the mountains (with map-themed helmet, goggles and jacket of course), and for my sins I am an avid supporter of Nottingham Forest FC.

Q: Tell us the story behind your map (what inspired you to make it, what did you learn while making it, or any other aspects of the map or its creation you would like people to know).

A: I’m always looking for interesting mapping themes. Normally these would involve the search for digital data that has to be persuaded and cajoled into some sort of map. I like to show people how to make great maps, sometimes just solid techniques done well, other times something a bit weird and wonderful to push the envelope, break a few rules and get creative. But I also like to use different mediums for making a map whether using Lego, pen and ink or…cheese. And these sort of maps are the ones that tend to stick in the memory because they’re different. They don’t conform. I was inspired by a map of English biscuits made by Chris Wesson a couple of years ago. It was a map of the UK with pictures of all sorts of tasty biscuits, where they were from and a little of their history. It was a great map but I couldn’t help think Chris might have actually made a large map as some sort of tablecloth and put real biscuits on top. And that’s when I thought of taking the basic idea and applying the concept to the UK cheese. Cartography is often about stealing ideas and then fashioning something new or interesting out of them and, so, I set about thinking through the map. It was an obvious approach really – I’d need a cheese board. I’d need it in the shape of the UK. And on top I’d place a selection of fine, rare, important or bizarre cheese. I’d take a picture and then people will eat the map…and the map would disappear. It’d be a one-time edible map. I researched the history of UK cheese production. I sought to identify a good geographical mix and from a list of around 400 cheeses I whittled it down to around 30 which would fit on a map.

Q: Tell us about the tools, data, etc., you used to make the map.

A: The map was fairly simple in design – just ceremonial counties of the UK. I made it in ArcGIS Pro and exported it as an svg file. By now I’d realised that I didn’t have the tools or experience to whittle the wood myself. I found a great craftsman called Andrew Abbott who had a CNC router and laser engraver. He took my design and made the map out of laminated blocks of Maple. We discussed all sorts of design aspects. He advised on what would work typographically at the scale of the final board. I was also planning on making the Isle of Man into a hole in the board but he suggested bits of cheese would simply fall through and get stuck…so I adapted the design accordingly. I also needed to do some really hefty generalisation on the coastline and internal boundaries so the laser engraver would work well – there simply wasn’t the space for overly complicated linework. It was a really good process to work together to ensure the design would work in the medium he was crafting.

I ended up with a cheese board around a metre tall and nearly as wide. Space for around 30-40 pieces of cheese. Sourcing the cheese wasn’t as simple as nipping to the local supermarket. The selection simply isn’t broad enough and some of the hard to get cheeses had to be sourced from niche artisanal suppliers. Some cheese was out of production (being seasonal), some impossible to source and some just not available in a quantity that would work. I eventually used a series of suppliers, had the cheese sent to my brother’s house in the UK as close to its eventual use as possible. I boarded a flight to the UK with my cheese board well packaged as excess baggage. It arrived in the UK undamaged. My brother drove the cheese to London from his home in Lincolnshire the day before it was to be displayed and I got the board and cheese across London to the Geovation hub one evening in September 2018 to display at the #geomob event. Cheese unwrapped, positioned according to a geographical list I’d prepared to ensure I didn’t make a mess of locating each piece, added a few labels and some context and sat back to watch a hungry crowd devour it. I wrote up a more extensive blog about the map here and there’s a bit on the GeoHipster blog here.

What next? Well, I quite like craft beer and there’s definitely geo in that. And someone suggested whiskey, except I can’t stand the stuff. Never have been able to drink it after a very unfortunate incident in my younger days. That’s another story entirely.

 

Maps and mappers of the 2018 calendar: Kate Keeley

Q: Tell us about yourself.

A: I always thought I was going to be a scientist and had a brief stint as researcher and field biologist. Then I decided I liked communicating science to the public more, and worked as an interpretive park ranger and zoo education specialist. And then I discovered GIS and the rest was history. With GIS, I found a tool that combined my technical side with my eye for design and an opportunity to communicate complex subjects in new and innovative ways.

A recent master’s graduate from the University of Michigan, I now work as a GIS consultant for an environmental consulting firm in Michigan and I couldn’t be happier. Say hi to @pokateo_ on Twitter (that’s po-kate-o like potato. Get it? I like potatoes)! Or mosey over to my website at https://kateberg.github.io/ to learn more about my journey.

Q: Tell us the story behind your map (what inspired you to make it, what did you learn while making it, or any other aspects of the map or its creation you would like people to know).

A: I stumbled across the Gallup-Sharecare Well-Being reports and immediately thought of making a map using a scale of happy to sad faces (sort of inspired by recently reading John Nelson’s suggestion in his latest ArcGIS blog post to use Chernoff faces for symbology). A quick Google search of PNG faces led me immediately to a bunch of cutouts of celebrity faces and I knew that’s what I wanted to use. I found faces with a variety of different emotions, from smiling to meh to frowning to crying and played around with a scale that made sense to me.

Q: Tell us about the tools, data, etc., you used to make the map.

A: I worked in ArcGIS Pro. I used my cubic tessellations I created for another project (also inspired by John Nelson. This time his Electo-Cubo-Grams) as the base (that was a whole other challenge; trying to fit all the states into a general US shape was quite difficult). With my base layers from that project, each state had its own point. Then, I uploaded the face PNGs as the point symbology for each state and went from there.

I was really excited by how it was shaping up, but I shared it with a couple of friends and they weren’t too keen on it. They said it [was] actually quite frightening:

(https://kateberg.github.io/img/Wellbeing/wellbeing1.png)

They said I should stop what I was doing and burn it with fire.

I was undeterred. Perhaps I was blind or a bit abstracted, but I still thought what I was doing was pretty cool.

I played with different ways to make the heads less creepy:

https://kateberg.github.io/img/Wellbeing/wellbeing2.png

https://kateberg.github.io/img/Wellbeing/wellbeing3.png

https://kateberg.github.io/img/Wellbeing/wellbeing4.png

https://kateberg.github.io/img/Wellbeing/wellbeing5.png

I noticed that the overall pattern of states’ well-being changed depending on the component (e.g. purpose, social, financial), so I wanted to find a way to include those patterns, without making the map look extra complicated (or creepy as it were). I found using the colored circles on the right to be a great way to provide a quick glance of the interesting patterns! Overall, I think the final result came out pretty neat and I’m very proud of it being selected for the GeoHipster Calendar!  You can read more at: https://kateberg.github.io/portfolio/wellbeing.html

 

Maps and mappers of the 2018 GeoHipster calendar — Atanas Entchev, October

Q: Tell us about yourself.

A: I am an architect and urban planner by training, and GISer by circumstance since 1991. I founded ENTCHEV GIS in 2005 and GeoHipster in 2013. Currently (since 2015) I am the GIS specialist for Franklin Township, NJ. Read more about me in my GeoHipster interview.

Q: Tell us the story behind your map (what inspired you to make it, what did you learn while making it, or any other aspects of the map or its creation you would like people to know).

A: This map is one in a series offering visual representation of all reported animal-vehicle crashes in Franklin Township over the course of several years. The map series informs environmental policy decisions in the town, particularly with regard to hunting regulations. I felt that discrete representation of point events was not communicating well the story behind the data, being that many animal crashes locations were concentrated in tight clusters — hence my choice of heat mapping for the series. I learned that deer population moves over time, which is probably obvious, but I never thought about it before.

Q: Tell us about the tools, data, etc., you used to make the map.

A: The map uses data from police reports. The project started in a MapInfo derivative, moved to QGIS, then ArcMap, then Paint.net. Data was originally created in MapInfo TAB, moved to SHP (hi, @shapefile! 🙂 ), then to GeoTIFF, to PNG, to PDN, to PNG, ultimately to PDF (of course!).

 

Maps and mappers of the 2018 GeoHipster calendar: Nathaniel Jeffrey, September

Q: Tell us about yourself.

I’ve been making maps professionally for over 10 years now.  But when I’m not doing that, I could be cooking, messing around in VR (how exactly do you ingest geojson into Unity, anyway?), or running about as fast as the world’s fastest 90 year old.  Seriously, I looked it up; his name is Frederico Fischer. My sprinting pace is terrible, but it keeps my legs thicc at least.

Q: Tell us the story behind your map (what inspired you to make it, what did you learn while making it, or any other aspects of the map or its creation you would like people to know).

Oh hey, speaking of running – my boss had the idea for this map while he was training for his first marathon.  He came into work on Monday and explained how cool it would be if we could produce a map that showed the bounding boxes of every map our business had ever made.  I agreed that it would indeed be cool. Then I promptly forgot about it.

Working on something completely unrelated a couple of months later, which required me to programmatically extract the coordinates at the corners of some map documents, I was reminded of his idea.  A bit of Python frankenscripting later – with StackExchange acting as Igor – and I was able to unleash this on our entire corporate directory of map files. Turns out, in ten years of using our current GIS, we’ve collectively authored over eighty thousand maps.

Zooming in to Melbourne (which accounted for 30,000+ maps on its own), I started to play around with layered transparencies to visualise the data.  This eventually evolved into a nice glowy blue colour scheme, which reminded me of deep space images of clusters of stars and galaxies, connected by glowing filaments.

This map has no practical use.  I’m fine with that. There’s still something really satisfying about it, how it just hints at the tens of thousands of hours of work that went in to making all of those maps, which are reduced down to their most basic representation.  It looks nice too (I think). If you got a GeoHipster calendar, I hope you think so too, because you’re stuck with it for this month.

Q: Tell us about the tools, data, etc., you used to make the map.

To scrape the data: A simple, custom Python script, run over a big and messy nested directory structure, full of .mxd files.  It extracted the x/y min/max coordinates of every map document, and reconstituted them into a shapefile full of rectangles.

To visualise the data: A mixture of ArcGIS Pro (I love the feature-level transparency), InkScape, and Paint.net.  

 

Jim Barry: “Believe in it? Then just build it.”

Jim Barry
Jim Barry
Jim is a geodeveloper advocate at Esri in NYC. Before that, he worked in Redlands running the developer network program, and previous to that, running Esri’s tech support operations. Catch him on twitter @JimBarry.

The statements and opinions below are Jim’s and not the opinions or official positions of his current or previous employers.

Jim was interviewed for GeoHipster by Bill Dollins and Atanas Entchev.

Q: How did you get into GIS?

A: I guess it started with an obsession with maps when I was a kid.

Going way back though, back seat of the car on family trips, I was completely absorbed by road atlases. My mom was the original mapgeek and navigator in the family; still is. So I got the maps thing from her — total map nerd. Not to mention my other assorted quirks, like staring at the ground from the window seat of a plane. It’s like a big map, yo!

Maps just kept coming back to me over and over as I grew up. Orienteering in scouts and beyond. As an infantry officer in the army, maps were key. Grab a lensatic compass, a 1:50,000 topo in a waterproof case, a grease pencil, and let’s go. I really took to land navigation, on foot or on vehicles, any weather, any terrain, swamps, woods, or desert, mostly at night. It’s more than just dead-reckoning to point B; it’s route selection, contingency planning, speed and manner of movement, under stress, wet, cold, hot, miserable, dealing with obstacles, leading soldiers keeping them motivated, pressed for time, pushing thru it, learning and adjusting along the way until you reach the objective. Maybe a little philosophical, but sort of a microcosm of life itself, no?

As for GIS itself, grad school, studying urban planning, we had PC ArcInfo and ArcView v1. I taught a couple semesters of freshman level Geography, and spent a year running the mapping lab, keeping the hardware working and software updated, helping students working on their projects, and learning the concepts of working with and analyzing spatial data. 

During grad school, but on the side, my first year I took an overnight job doing mapping at an electric utility. I got a real sense of the importance of this kind of high-impact production mapping—a lot of editing, complete and accurate information, and a high level of quality control when electrical service for customers, and the safety of the maintenance crews were at stake. 

Then in my second year of grad school I got hired by a small town outside of Hartford to research and build their 10-year master plan of development. I used PC ArcInfo, ArcCAD, and ArcView for that. They had only been using AutoCAD. I was able to do some spatial analysis using whatever data I could find, convert, digitize, or otherwise collect, to provide support for some recommendations for development, preservation, transportation, and other aspects of the town’s growth and progress. 

I really liked working with the tools, so figured I’d try to work at Esri for a few years, learn as much as I can, then take back to municipal planning. Well, a few years turned into 24 and running.

Q: You have been at Esri for over two decades. How would you describe life at Esri to an outsider?

A: Always challenging. First couple of years I was a desktop GIS tech support analyst. To me, there’s no better place to learn how to be productive with this technology, than in tech support. Not only do you learn how things work best, but also the wide variety of ways things break, and how to quickly find the cause, work up a solution, alone or in groups, sometimes code up alternatives, workarounds, and communicate that to the user trying to get their work done, often under pressure themselves. Fun stuff. Even after moving up into running tech support ops, I’d grab calls myself from time to time to keep the problem-solving and tech skills sharp as I could. The tech moves and grows fast. It’s quick and easy to lose your grip on it, if you don’t keep chopping.

But overall, the ability to do important, impactful work, surrounded by and learning from some of the smartest people I’ve ever met. But more importantly, everyone here buys into the idealism that Jack projects. He’s a true believer in what technology, in general, and of course GIS in particular provides to improve our co-existence with our world, in a data-driven way.

I saw this quote once. I think it was meant to stoke one’s entrepreneurial spirit by saying “If you don’t work to realize your own ideas, you’ll end up working to realize someone else’s”. Being that I’m a fairly UNcreative person, that quote motivated me too, but probably in a direction 180° from its intent. Meaning, I consider my value more about building and delivering tangible, useful things from the ideas envisioned by creative people, freeing them up to continue being creative. That’s the main reason why I’ve always felt a good fit at Esri. Jack’s visionary thought leadership over the past several decades, and his commitment to build and constantly improve (and occasionally completely reinvent) has been an honor and a great experience to be part of. 

Q: You have been working in developer evangelism for over a decade now. During that time, Esri’s platforms have changed and grown significantly. How has working with developers shaped your view of the evolution of Esri’s platforms and what role has the developer community played in that evolution?

A: Understanding the evolution of developers, and of developing software apps and systems, starts by understanding the evolution of users and their expectations. 

Back in the 90s when I first started building custom mapping apps, this might sound really odd now, but usability wasn’t exactly our primary concern, generally. You designed and built the app, and then you deployed it with documentation and training. As your end-user climbed the learning curve, their productivity would increase. Back then, “powerfully useful” was more important than “intuitively usable”. But it was still mainly up to the user to commit effort learning how to use it.

Of course, nowadays, in most cases, that approach is absolutely insane. (Well, it was insane then too, but who knew?) Today, when you put an app in the hands of an end-user, it better be designed to be intuitive for them, and productively useful for them right away, for what they need it to do. Apps you build need to free your users up, so they can put almost all their mental effort into their work and put as little effort as possible into figuring out how the app works. 

That expectation bounces right back to the developers who build and use APIs, and the designers of the apps being used. It’s no longer enough that the API be powerful, fine grained, and comprehensive (hi ArcObjects). Now, its granularity also needs to be variable, doc accessible, learning ramp shallow, samples numerous, best practices proven, and user community robust, interactive, and supportive enough so that we meet these high expectations. It takes a lot of work to make things easy.  Also, the shelf life of things developers build is also shortening. Developers often need to deploy something good enough now, then iterate to continue improving it.

Q: You wrote about smart cities recently. Is “smart cities” the new buzzword de jour, or is it GIS trying to reinvent itself, or is it an entire new industry being born?

A: A new industry? No, it’s broader than that. It’s a way for cities to keep up with fully using technology to make itself run better. Of course, GIS is a key part of it—here’s how. A smart city is one that uses technology to continually sense its state and respond in efficient, optimized ways. Human intervention is removed whenever practical, to gain speed and scale. Combined with the hardware and software technology itself, it also includes a digitized articulation of the rules on which decisions can be made, and actions triggered. Then, on a separate thread, patterns can be sensed, stored, analyzed in order to continue improving efficiency in future iterations. 

Given that a city is a spatial system, spatial analysis has got to be a key part of these rules, decisions, and actions. Along with many other technologies, GIS fuels the decisions behind visualizing where things are and optimizing how, why, when, and where things move and interact. A GIS platform also provides cross-agency collaboration tools and the ability to perform modeling and predictive data analytics.

The data management, data analysis, data visualization tools that are a part of GIS and geospatial technology have a role to play in a “smart city”, from strategy down to the nuts and bolts. I can’t imagine how they wouldn’t.

Ok, so to me, yeah, in a way, “smart cities” can be seen as a buzzword, but it’s an important one, a motivating one. Meaning, it’s a simple term that helps everyone quickly focus in on what cities are trying to do to evolve. It’s easier for all of us to grab the handles and pull the wagon in the same direction if we’re not stuck struggling to understand what the term means. 50 years from now, a city’s “smartness” in this context will be so common, the concept itself is going to melt into the background and we’ll probably forget that the term “smart city” used to be a “thing”. Like the idea of an electric city was 100+ years ago versus today. But for now, we need the term, because it’s going to take a lot of domains working together to make cities smarter.

Q: Esri recently pledged $30,000.00 to the GDAL barn raising. Esri has famously used GDAL libraries under the hood of ArcGIS for many years now, so the pledge makes sense. How would you characterize Esri’s relationship with open-source and the open source community, particularly in geospatial? What steps do you anticipate Esri taking to help that relationship evolve?

A: Ask 10 people what “open” means, you’ll get 12 different answers. So, for me, I keep it practical, and I try to stay focused on how the level of openness helps or hinders productive work in any particular context.

As for open source software, I’ve seen some choose it based simply on principle. Some choose it when it’s free, or when its initial barrier to use is lower than other options. I mean, I get it. Open source provides a perception (sometimes an illusion) of control, and a perception (sometimes an illusion) of low cost.

But, over the past several years at least, I’ve seen a growth of users and developers who are trying to get their work done best, or build things that are more useful, whose technology selection has more to do with its capabilities, than whether or not they can contribute to the code base. On the surface, the terms open and closed imply a binary, but when it comes to technology it’s obviously a lot more complex and nuanced than that.

In our increasingly connected world, for a technology to be useful, it needs to be openly interoperable with other tech. It also needs to support open standards with regards to format (hi Shapefile), workflow, protocols, and interface (both UI and API).

And then there’s open data. It benefits all of us to support open data, particularly in government, in order to promote freedom and transparency, optimize operations, encourage collaboration, but also to engage the people who live there. In NYC there is a vast ecosystem of non-profits, startups, students, motivated citizens, and more, ready to pitch in, and they do amazing work. It’s a force multiplier to ensure that accurate, complete, timely data is pushed into the open, into the hands of everyone, fueling great ideas. Doing so continues to improve the lives of New Yorkers every day.

Back to open source though… 

Where a particular technology, any technology, open source or not, is better, more useful, more cost effective, it will be used. A few years ago, Chris Wanstrath was the keynote speaker at the Esri Developer Summit. He was a founder, and at the time CTO of GitHub. He noted that while GitHub has played a huge role in the support, usefulness, and growth of open source software, GitHub itself is not open source. He found that open source makes sense, when openly inclusive collaboration is the best approach to building something, and it doesn’t make sense when you want to build something that supports your core business model, and for as long as you want to maintain full creative control. When it comes down to it, the relationship between the two is more productive when it’s symbiotic rather than adversarial. The way I see it is this: our work contains a lot of constraints we have limited control over; it makes no sense to purposefully add more constraints by limiting our own options.

Q: You are from New Jersey — home of The Sopranos, Bridgegate, and Silent Bob. I hear you have a special connection to one of those. Tell us about it.

A: The shore area of New Jersey, yes, born and raised in that magical state where the government still believes pumping gas is a task best left to paid professionals. 

So yeah, after a couple decades in Redlands, I recently moved back to my hometown of Leonardo, NJ. Most of my family still live in the area, and it’s great to be back. Silent Bob, right, well, Leonardo is the town the movie Clerks was filmed in. The Quick Stop is still there, the dive bar of convenience stores. Anyway, when I was 14, I had a newspaper route and that store was the halfway point. I would go in and grab a soda for the return trip. One day, the guy who worked in there said I could have the coke for free if I’d go in the back and load the dairy case with milk, eggs, cheese, and stuff, that had been delivered, which at the time could only be loaded from the back of the store. Otherwise he’d have to lock up, stock the case, then reopen (“I assure you we’re open”). I think I was only hauling in $15 a week at that point with the paper route, so I’m like, cool. For a while, this turned into an almost daily thing. I hadn’t seen the movie til many years later, but it was weird to see our little hole in the wall store be a central character of a big movie. “Bunch of savages in this town”, indeed.

Q: Finish this sentence: If I could only keep one of my sports jerseys, it would be…

A: I’ve got a bunch, but this Hartford Whalers jersey I have, well, I normally resist wearing third party gear to games, but this one seems to be an exception. Wore it to a Rangers game last winter and it’s obvious that hockey fans get it. Plus, it’s a pretty cool logo.

Q: Do you consider yourself a geohipster? Why / why not?

A: Not at all. While I respect and am inspired by the innovation that comes from the unconventional thinking of all you hipsters, for the most part, my strengths (and weaknesses) seem to stem from being a straight up conformist. But then in a way, without us conformists, being a hipster lacks the frame of reference from which to diverge — there’s no contrast. So to all you real geohipsters out there… you’re welcome. 

Q: On closing, any words of wisdom for our readers?

A: If you have an idea — a solid idea that has a vision and a purpose, and you really believe in it — you’re ready to sink or swim in it — don’t wait, don’t check, don’t ask — just do it. Probably intuitively obvious to many; wasn’t obvious to me for a long time.

Meaning, what I’ve found that often doesn’t work, is trying to sell others on your idea when it’s still nothing more than an idea. All this does is open the door for it to be crushed under the weight of opinions. And at that point, your great idea becomes just another deleted slide deck. So. Don’t ask for permission. Believe in it? Then just build it. When you need others’ collaboration on bits of it, keep it focused, and limited to trusted resources. 

Here’s the point though. Believing in it of course means you’re ready to own the consequences, whether it works, or whether it lawn darts into the ground. Best case scenario, it works, and at that point you’ve improved things a notch or two for your users, added value to your product, helped move the ball forward for your organization. Not to mention you learned a lot along the way. But most importantly, those who earlier might have crushed your idea — they vanish. No one argues with success. No one debates whether something will work or not, after it’s already working.

Atanas Entchev to GeoHipster: “Nobody’s asked me for a geopackage yet”

Atanas Entchev
Atanas Entchev
The founder of GeoHipster, Atanas Entchev, learned BASIC in 1984 on a made-in-Bulgaria Apple ][ clone, and has been working with computers ever since. These days he splits his time between slinging shapefiles and searching for the perfect saddle for his Cannondale. Find him on Twitter, Instagram, and on his personal blog Mostly Subjective.

Atanas was interviewed for GeoHipster by Board Member Bill Dollins and CEO Mike Dolbow.

Q: For any readers who don’t know, tell us about yourself and how you got into geospatial.

A: My road to geospatial was long and circuitous. I graduated with a Master’s in architecture in my native Sofia, Bulgaria. Upon graduation I was assigned a job as an urban planner. In 1991 I came to Rutgers University in New Jersey to complete a Master’s in urban planning, where I was indoctrinated into the Arc world on PC ARC/INFO on DOS. While still in grad school and looking for a “real” job as a planner, I took a GIS internship position at the NJDEP, digitizing parcels in ArcInfo on a SUN Sparc workstation. Temporarily. As it turned out, there is nothing more permanent than the temporary. I have been “doing GIS” ever since.

Q: Between early pieces in Directions, to your own blog(s), to your activity on various social media platforms, you have been a visible face and an early adopter of social platforms in the geospatial community for almost two decades. What effect have those platforms had on the landscape of geospatial technology? How have those platforms changed? What would the ideal social platform look like to you, today?

A: The biggest effect social media platforms have had on the landscape of geospatial technology is that blogs and social media have all but eliminated the need to go to conferences. This is probably an unpopular opinion, and easily challenged by the fact that geoconferences seem to be multiplying. But you don’t need to go to a conference anymore to find out what’s happening in the industry. The blogs and social media deliver high-quality, high-signal-to-noise-ratio content, right to your screen, better than any keynote. Heck, you can “attend” multiple conferences simultaneously and be billable at the same time.

Obviously, there are other things that happen at conferences — geobeers, geoteas, geohookups — so conferences aren’t going away. But the reasons for going to conferences have shifted. Get out of work, anyone? Travel to a new city/country? On your employer’s dime? Sign me up!

Three things drive people to social networks: FOMO, interestingness, and utility — probably in that order. Early Twitter was interesting. Less so these days, but I stay because of utility. Instagram is interesting, but has no utility. Facebook has neither.

How have platforms changed? They become less interesting as they grow and mature. The ideal social platform must stay interesting, and combine interestingness with utility.

Q: Wow, I can’t believe that this December will mark the five year anniversary of the geohipster.com launch with a tongue-in-cheek industry poll. Looking back on that moment and what has happened since, were there any surprises?

A: The biggest surprise was that it took off the way it did. I registered the domain name on a lark, I thought some kind of website would be good for a few chuckles at most. Five years later GeoHipster is running strong, bigger than I ever thought it would be.

I would be remiss if I did not acknowledge Glenn Letham and Renee Sieber, two early advisors who offered ideas and encouragement in the very beginning. Mike Dolbow became the first guest interviewer, then the advisory board took shape, then Mike and Jonah and Amy stepped up to share with me the many duties that go into putting out a web publication. Were it not for these people, GeoHipster would not exist today.

Q: Walk us through a typical day for you – not just for your day job, but also for your “side hustles”.

A: My day job as the GIS specialist in Franklin Township, New Jersey, includes multiple various GIS-related duties, so it’s never boring. I maintain several PostgreSQL/PostGIS databases; I dabble in SQL and Python. I make maps to print (PDF FTW); I help township staff with various geo-related tasks; I create shapefiles; I export databases to shapefiles to share with other organizations; I add new township streets to Open Street Map.

I use a mixed bag of tools: ArcGIS Desktop, QGIS, ArcGIS Pro, ArcGIS Online, CARTO.

My latest side hustle is designing, promoting, and selling the “I♥️SHP” merchandise. My plan is to grow it to a point where I can quit my job and retire. My other side hustle is GIS consulting — mostly training, teaching GIS novices how to use shapefiles (no joke; shapefile haters leave a lot of money on the table), and some GIS and web development. And, of course, I help run GeoHipster as Editor-in-chief.

After work and on weekends I ride my bike, sometimes with my daughter. Or tackle a side hustle task. Or go to the beach with my wife. Or we go to concerts (Buddy Guy, Jonny Lang, Kenny Wayne Shepherd, Gov’t Mule this summer).

Q: The “I♥️SHP” merchandise seems to be really taking off. Any plans to expand it for the “sidecar files”?

A: As soon as Taylor Swift agrees to wear a “PRJ” shirt for the promo campaign. I have my people talking to her people. Seriously, though, I consider “SHP” a pars pro toto moniker, thus including all sidecars. The shapefile agrees.

Q: If the shapefile disappears tomorrow as though it never existed, to which format would you switch?

A: To whichever format has critical mass. For the record, I don’t use shapefiles exclusively — I use PostGIS on PostgreSQL and file geodatabases in equal measure. But when I need to create a quick disposable layer for a quick map, shapefile it is. And when it comes to spatial data exchange, the shapefile is the undisputed king. In my job I share spatial data with a large number of users, mostly external. Every single one of them asks for shapefiles. So I give them shapefiles. I’m not gonna fight them. If they start asking for geopackage, I will give them geopackage. Nobody has asked as of yet.

I wrote about my position in the shapefile debate on my personal blog. To quote myself: “To call for the abolition of the shapefile is akin to calling for the abolition of the .xls(x) format on the grounds that millions of people erroneously use it in lieu of “legitimate” databases.”

There is currently a shapefile vendetta raging on the twitters. I think it’s silly. If and when it is no longer needed, the shapefile will fade away.

Q: GeoHipster readers, and many others, have followed the ordeal of your family and your son, Eni, closely. Would you provide an update?

A: For those who may not know, last December my son was deported to Bulgaria — a country he does not remember and whose language he does not speak, but where he is “from”. We are working on bringing Eni back home. We are pursuing all possible avenues. This will be a long and complicated process. Meanwhile he has settled in Sofia, has found a job that he likes, and is making friends. He is in good spirits. We communicate via social media and chat almost daily. My son is making the most of this bizarre and unfortunate situation, and has made me proud with his ability to handle adversity.

I want to thank the hundreds of people, most of whom I have never met, for their outpouring of support for my family’s plight, and for reaffirming my faith in humanity.

Q: Sounds like you’ve been riding your bike more and more lately. Do you and Bill have some kind of exercise competition going?

A: I post more bike pics lately — or, rather, I post less other stuff than I used to — which makes it look like cycling is all I do. But I have indeed been riding more and more lately. I rode my first metric century (100+ km) in May, and I aspire to ride my first full century (100+ miles) next year. I love cycling — it is a great sport, great exercise, and with the right equipment you can cycle year-round.

Above all else, cycling for me is meditation on wheels. It helps me clear out my head. When I am on the bike, I think about nothing. It feels great.

Bill and I do not have a competition, but maybe we should. What would be the metrics, though? Bill? (We’ll let Bill answer this question on Twitter. –Ed)

Q: What is your grammatical pet peeve that would most surprise GeoHipster readers?

A: What would probably be most surprising to those who know me is that while I used to be a grammar nazi, I am working on kicking the habit, and I have made significant strides in this effort. I remember when, in the early 1990s, I wrote a letter — on paper — to TIME magazine, to complain about a grammatical error. I composed a letter, printed it in the computer lab, put it in an envelope, put a stamp on it, walked it to a mailbox… TIME wrote back, by the way, acknowledged the error, and apologized. Today I look back on this episode and cringe with embarrassment. There are far more important things to spend one’s time and energy on than correcting other people’s grammar. (or style, e.g.: Oxford comma, double space after a period, etc. 😉 ). I try to remember what The Duchess said to Alice: “Take care of the sense and the sounds will take care of themselves.”

Q: You’re the “OG” – Original GeoHipster – so I don’t think we really need to ask you that question. Instead, do you have any favorite answers to that question from the last five years?

Brian Timoney: The hippest thing I’ve ever done was switch from pleated khakis to flat-front khakis.

Guido Stein: The only hipster attribute I wish I had that I lack is the hipster gene that makes them all slender and buff.

Alex Leith: I knit maps, then scan them at 10 µm before faxing them to myself.

 

Maps and mappers of the 2018 GeoHipster calendar: Topi Tjukanov, August

Q: Tell us about yourself.

A: I’m a geospatial geek from Finland. I do this kind of visualization for fun and as a freelancing work. You can read more about me from this GeoHipster interview: http://geohipster.com/2018/04/16/topi-tjukanov-in-finnish-basemaps-forest-is-white/

Q: Tell us the story behind your map (what inspired you to make it, what did you learn while making it, or any other aspects of the map or its creation you would like people to know).

A: I originally saw the Roads to Rome project from moovel Lab and was really inspired by that. I wanted to recreate that with my own tools. I had already done a few similar maps before this, but this one was custom made for the GeoHipster calendar submissions! While making the map I learned a lot more about Python. Basically before venturing into this, my Python skills were almost non-existent, but this was a great way to learn as I had a clear goal in mind. Writing the simple script for the API calls was a small step for mankind, but a big step for me. I wanted to keep the style really simple and clean so I didn’t want to add anything else than the routes and graticules on the final map.

Q: Tell us about the tools, data, etc., you used to make the map.

A: The data is from OpenStreetMap. Routing is done with the great GraphHopper open source routing engine. GPX routes were then stored into a single PostGIS table and visualized with QGIS. Graticules are from Natural Earth.

You can find a bit more info, links, and an animated version here: https://tjukanov.org/roadsofamerica/

 

Maps and mappers of the 2018 GeoHipster calendar — Kurt Menke

Q: Tell us about yourself.

A: I am the owner of a small geo consultancy Bird’s Eye View based out of Albuquerque, New Mexico. My biggest focus areas are conservation, public health and training, but my clientele have become more and more diverse in recent years. I am an avid open source proponent and have authored two books on QGIS: Mastering QGIS and Discover QGIS. In the small amount of spare time I seem to have, I like working out, getting out into big wild spaces/mountains, playing board games while spinning some vinyl, raising chickens, and good coffee. I also love having the time to be creative and put together a nice map.

Q: Tell us the story behind your map (what inspired you to make it, what did you learn while making it, or any other aspects of the map or its creation you would like people to know).

A: This map was produced for a coalition working to protect the San Gabriel Mountains called San Gabriel Mountains Forever. The target audience was U.S. Congresswoman Judy Chu’s staff and the general public. It shows a series of proposed protections: expansion of the existing San Gabriel National Monument, a new National Recreation Area, expansion of several existing wilderness areas along with 6 new wilderness proposals, and several new wild and scenic rivers. The goal was to create a map highlighting these proposals with a clean modern look.

Q: Tell us about the tools, data, etc., you used to make the map.

A: This was created with the QGIS nightlies, which last fall was version 2.99. This gave me a chance to check out some of the new emerging features coming with version 3. The proposal data was digitized using QGIS. The Stamen Terrain basemap is being seen through a similarly colored State boundary layer employing some transparency and the multiply blending mode. Existing wilderness and proposals also employ the multiply blending mode. Wilderness areas were obtained from Wilderness.net and highways were sourced from CalTrans. Highways were styled as white lines so that they would fall to the background. They look better digitally than in print form…is a map ever done? Cities were shown simply as labels.