Monthly Archives: June 2017

GeoHipster Mixtape Volume 2

GeoHipster Mixtape Volume 2

Last April we published the first GeoHipster Mixtape,  a look into the tunes we chill to, scream to, and grind to during the work day. This is Volume 2.

On most days we listen to the soundtrack of work:  phones, email notifications, office chatter, or the sound of the city. For some of us our daily soundtrack is a carefully curated playlist of our favorite tunes. Being in the latter group, music can provide the white noise needed to push through an hour of getting the labels “just right”, or the inspiration that sparks the fix for that problem with your code.

I was curious about what others are listening to during the day — what does a geohipster listen to?

As you might expect, asking anyone who likes music to pick a few songs can be a near-futile task. A desert island playlist would be drastically different from a top side one, track ones playlist. Making a mixtape is subtle art, there are many rules — like making a map. I recently talked to several of our interesting colleagues in geo to see what tunes get them through the day. I asked the impossible: pick  3 tracks they love to share for a mixtape.

For your listening and reading pleasure we have hand-crafted a carefully-curated playlist from the geohipsters below, complete with liner notes of the cool work they do while listening to the tracks they picked.

Ps. i couldn’t help but add a few selections of my own.
Sorry/Not Sorry
jonah

For your enjoyment, a YouTube playlist — the GeoHipster Mixtape Volume 2


 Brooke Harding @BrookEHarding  || GIS Specialist at USAID-Macfadden

Brooke is a Cartographer and Data Analyst specializing in Europe & Asia and government acronyms. Outside of the office she’s all about supporting her fellow #geopeeps through organizations like the NACIS (Check out their October 2017 conference in Montreal, eh?) and eating her way through #geobreakfastdc one waffle at a time.

  • Paul Simon feat. Chevy Chase – Call Me Al
  • T-Pain – NPR Tiny Desk Concert
  • Nahko and Medicine for the People – Black as Night

John Nelson  || Cartographer at Esri

John works in a small wooden shed in his back yard. He does everything from making points on a map glow like fireflies to hacking up cartographic techniques to use on your next map.

 

  • Seu Jorge – Changes (from The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou)
  • Sigur Rós – Hoppípolla
  • Flatt & Scruggs – Doin’ My Time (from 16 Original Bluegrass Hits)

Cristen Jones // UI designer

Cristen’s an urban planner by training and used to be one of those civic hackers found at Boston-area hackathons and meetups. She’s worked with Code for Boston on and , but more recently    joined Maptime Boston as a co-organizer.

  • Childish Gambino – Break
  • Madeon – Pop culture
  • Daddy Yankee – Shaky Shaky

Dylan Moriarty // Illustrator & Cartographer

Dylan is bad at writing bios, but he has a swell website — believes in open source — loves hand-made maps & hand-drawn elements — helps run GeobreakfastDC & MaptimeDC () — works with the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team & designed Missing Maps — spends most waking hours listening to tunes

  • Buddy Rich – Norwegian Wood
  • tUnE-yArDs – My Country
  • Medeski, Martin & Wood – Let’s Go Everywhere

Amy Smith  @wolfmapper // Uber
Policy research, data science & mapping at Uber. Thinks a lot about cities, maps, and transportation. Sometimes writes about them too. Proud GeoHipster interviewer and board member.

 

  • Todd Rundgren – Hello Its Me
  • YMCK – Magical 8Bit Tour
  • Gillian Welch – Hard Times

Hannes  // HafenCity Universität Hamburg

Hannes breaks GDAL doing crazy things, procrastinates with Shapely doing silly things, and enjoys QGIS doing useful things.

 

  • L.S.G. Transmutation (reworked)
  • Bohren & Der Club of Gore – On Demon Wings
  • Wolfgang Hartmayer – Every Day

Juliet Eldred   // Student at the University of Chicago

Juliet is a Geography/Visual Arts double-major, which means she spends a lot of time making and looking at maps. When she’s not sleeping, biking, or yelling at QGIS, she runs the geospatial meme Facebook group “I feel personally attacked by this relatable map” and works as a DJ at WHPK, her school’s radio station.

  • Built to Spill – Car
  • Sleater-Kinney – Light Rail Coyote
  • Emperor X – Wasted on the Senate Floor

Maps and Mappers of the 2017 GeoHipster Calendar: Mark Brown

Mark Brown MSc – February

Tell us about yourself.

I am an ecologist and conservationist with strong technical skills in GIS & Remote Sensing. My interests lie in the application of geospatial technologies to help solve ecological and environmental problems. I love developing novel techniques in areas where these technologies might not have been previously used.

For the past several years I have been working on landscape scale habitat restoration schemes such as the Yorkshire Peat Partnership in the uplands of northern England. There is a very special type of habitat found here known as a blanket bog. Referred to as the ‘rainforests’ of the UK, they are home to many unique plants and animals. These areas of land are not covered by trees however, but a ‘blanket’ of peat material that has formed over thousands of years through the accumulation of dead plant material such as Sphagnum Mosses. Due to this they act as a massive carbon sink. They are also a very important source for much of our drinking water and help to regulate runoff and therefore flooding. They are also an important site for leisure and recreation.

Despite this, most of these habitats are in a heavily degraded state. Mismanagement of this land through burning and overgrazing, as well as natural causes such as wildfires, is causing much of it to erode away. Once peat is exposed to the elements, it rapidly wears away releasing carbon and entering waterways, where it turns the water a brown colour similar to English Breakfast tea. Peat that is dissolved in waterways is causing a problem for water companies, as they have to spend millions of pounds each year to remove the peat through chemical treatments.

The project I work on aims to reverse degradation of the blanket bog by providing the stable conditions necessary for its recovery

In order to do this we need to identify those areas currently undergoing or most at risk of erosion and this is where I come in.

As well as being qualified with an MSc in Geographical Information Systems, I am also a certified Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) pilot. I use a fixed-wing drone known as a senseFly eBee to capture aerial imagery and to generate digital surface models (DSMs) of the habitats that we work on. This data is of a very high resolution (up to 1.5cm!). This gives me the capability to examine and analyse the blanket bogs in an unprecedented level of detail.

I use this data within GIS and remote sensing software to carry out a whole range of analyses. This includes but is not limited to topographic modelling, hydrological analysis, feature extraction, Object-Based Image Analysis (OBIA) to detect different types of vegetation communities and exposed peat, 3D visualisation, and the creation of cross-sectional profiles to determine the dimensions of eroding gullies.

If you’re sat there reading this and wondering what on earth is a blanket bog?! I’d suggest having a look at the Yorkshire Peat Partnership Facebook page. There are lots of interesting photographs of the landscapes as well as our restoration works and imagery of the UAV in action. See link below:

https://www.facebook.com/YorkshirePeatPartnership/

Tell us the story behind your map (what inspired you to make it, what did you learn while making it, or any other aspects of the map or its creation you would like people to know).

I’m sorry to admit it but blanket bogs just aren’t sexy! With no charismatic fauna, cold, wind and rain, to the untrained eye there’s not really much there. They are often seen as barren wastelands. However if you delve down among the undergrowth, there are many interesting species of lichens, mosses, and England’s only carnivorous plants!

This map was part of a series of images that I created in an effort to make blanket bogs more interesting to the public eye. It has been used in Yorkshire Peat Partnership reports as well as at international conferences.

I was interested in creating a series of photorealistic terrain models of blanket bogs. I visualised the terrain in open-source 3D modelling software with a light source over a white background. This creates the interesting shadow effect so the terrain looks like it is floating over a white surface.

This was a departure from my usual workflow as I normally work exclusively with GIS software such as QGIS. However I found that this was providing too many limitations for graphical visualisations and it was interesting to learn an entirely new piece of software from scratch.

Actually I was quite surprised to be selected for the calendar. I think if I was to enter the image again I would put more information on the image regarding what the image actually is and how it was generated. Hindsight however is a wonderful thing!

I was super pleased to be selected and hopefully this will introduce a very novel application of GIS and remote sensing to a wider audience!

Tell us about the tools, data, etc., you used to make the map

The UAV I used to survey the site was a senseFly eBee. (https://www.sensefly.com/drones/ebee.html). This is a small fixed-wing drone that is proving to be one of the most popular commercially-available drones for surveying and mapping purposes. The UAV is fully automated and flies along pre-defined transects,taking photographs along the way.

The imagery that was captured was then processed within photogrammetry software known as Pix4D Mapper (https://pix4d.com/). This software is used to generate point clouds, digital surface and terrain models, orthomosaics, and textured models.

The resulting orthophotograph and digital surface model was then imported into Blender (https://www.blender.org/) where the image was rendered. Blender is an open source 3D modelling software package. It is more commonly used for 3D art, animation, and the creation of computer games.

Maps and Mappers of the 2017 GeoHipster Calendar: Ralph Straumann

Ralph Straumann – June

Tell us about yourself.

I’m a consultant, data analyst, and researcher with EBP in Switzerland and the Oxford Internet Institute in the UK. My background is in geography, with a PhD in geoinformation science from the University of Zurich. Besides GIS I studied remote sensing, cartography, and political science. In my work for EBP I assist clients with data analysis tasks, do strategy and organizational consulting, and build tools, geodata infrastructures, and workflows. In my free time I occasionally blog about GIS, data, and visualization.

Tell us the story behind your map (what inspired you to make it, what did you learn while making it, or any other aspects of the map or its creation you would like people to know).

A few years ago, Stephan Heuel and I developed a raster-based walking time analysis tool. This product has since matured into Walkalytics. Based on OpenStreetMap and/or cadastral surveying data, we can infer the time it takes somebody to walk to or from a place, construct pedestrian isochrones, and compute quality of service metrics, e.g. for public transit. We can carry out these types of analyses world-wide, at high resolution, very fast, and taking into account the topography. The map serves as an illustration of the capabilities and versatility of Walkalytics.

Tell us about the tools, data, etc., you used to make the map.

I used our Python Walkalytics client and a test subscription to the Walkalytics API to derive the data for the map. Besides, I used data from the (in my opinion, fantastic) Natural Earth. I then designed the map entirely in ArcMap. I tried to move away from the ArcGIS defaults. I’m simplifying, but I think a map tends to be good when you cannot tell straight-away which software has been used to make it. For the interested: Below you can see a GIF of some of the revisions of my map for the GeoHipster calendar:

Maps and Mappers of the 2017 GeoHipster Calendar: Jan-Willem van Aalst

J.W. van Aalst, Ph.D. – November

Tell us about yourself.

I’m a cartographic designer and data analyst. I live and work in The Netherlands. My background is in computer science; I did my Ph.D. on knowledge management at Delft University. These days I mostly advise the Dutch Emergency services on (geo) information management.

Tell us the story behind your map (what inspired you to make it, what did you learn while making it, or any other aspects of the map or its creation you would like people to know).

The map is part of my Dutch OpenTopo series, which I designed to supply the Dutch emergency responders with the most up-to-date topographic maps possible. I’ve always experimented with combining the best ingredients of various map sources, including the geospatial base registries published by the Dutch government as Open data. The result is now available at www.opentopo.nl.

Tell us about the tools, data, etc., you used to make the map.

The map was made using QGIS. Some post-processing of the raster output of QGIS is done using GDAL. The map data is stored in a PostgreSQL/PostGIS database. The data itself is made “PostGIS-ready” using the Dutch NLExtract tools developed by some geo-wizards also associated to the Dutch branch of OsGeo.org. The map features data from several Dutch Base Registries (BRT, BAG, BGT, BRK) and also contains various elements extracted from OpenStreetMap.